Category Archives for Addiction or Recovery Article

Depression Symptoms Increase Over Time For Addiction-Prone Women

This is an article from “Medical News Today” that primarily addresses clinical depression in high-risk addiction-prone women. It’s a multi-year study, which makes it interesting, but that’s not why I decided to publish it on this particular blog. Two of the findings support statements I made, and other studies I referenced in chapter 4 of Powerless No Longer. Here is the synopsis of the new study:

“Unlike alcohol problems and antisocial behavior, depression doesn’t decline with age in addiction-prone women in their 30s and 40s it continues to increase, a new study led by University of Michigan Health System researchers found.Continue reading

Training the Brain to Think Ahead

From time-to-time, I will post articles such as this that highlight promising new research that supports recovery ideas and principles that appear in “Powerless No Longer.” This article, from “Medical News Today, addresses research into the disability of addicts to delay short-term gratification, even when they know that the long-term consequences of using are dire.

“The growing numbers of new cases of substance abuse disorders are perplexing. After all, the course of drug addiction so often ends badly. The negative consequences of drug abuse appear regularly on TV, from stories of celebrities behaving in socially inappropriate and self-destructive ways while intoxicated to dramatization of the rigors of drug withdrawal on “Intervention” and other reality shows.

Schools now educate students about the risks of addiction. While having a keen awareness of the negative long-term repercussions of substance use protects some people from developing addictions, others remain vulnerable.

One reason that education alone cannot prevent substance abuse is that people who are vulnerable to developing substance abuse disorders tend to exhibit a trait called “delay discounting”, which is the tendency to devalue rewards and punishments that occur in the future. Delay discounting may be paralleled by “reward myopia”, a tendency to opt for immediately rewarding stimuli, like drugs. Continue reading