Tag Archives for " Precontemplative "

The Precontemplative — Living in Denial

Most of us go on with our destructive habits for years until something awakens us, and unfortunately it’s impossible to predict what it will take to make a individual aware of their condition. Early in my own recovery, I accompanied some AA friends who were going to tell their stories to a group of men who were confined in a minimum-security facility for alcohol-related automobile offenses in Connecticut. These inmates had repeated arrests for driving under the influence (DUI) and there were some who were there for what was then called “involuntary vehicular homicide while under the influence.”Continue reading

The Precontemplative – Living in Denial

In this post, we will be talking about the first stage of the model of change, the Precontemplative, those who have not, as yet, made the connection between the substance they are abusing and the problems in their lives. Unfortunately, there is no clear program, procedure, or method guaranteed to help such people make the connection, other than trying not to stand between them and the consequences of their own behavior.

Most of us go on with our destructive habits for years until someone or something wakes us up, and unfortunately it’s impossible to predict what it will take to make a individual aware of his or her particular condition. Fairly early in my own recovery, I went along with some AA friends who were invited to tell their stories to a group of men who were confined in a minimum-security facility for alcohol-related offenses in Connecticut. These inmates were in Camp Hartell for a variety of offenses, mostly related to repeated arrests for driving under the influence (DUI), and there were even a few who were in there for what was then called “involuntary vehicular homicide while under the influence,” meaning they were responsible for the death of at least one innocent human being because they chose to continue to drink.

I talked with some of these fellows, and to a man they just couldn’t wait to get back out and “have a beer.” Here they were, locked-up, separated from friends and family, in deep legal trouble, and they couldn’t make the connection between the obvious problems in their lives and the alcohol they were drinking! I’ve worked with many substance abusers in various prison facilities, and in their minds, the problem wasn’t the substance at all, it was always something “else,” something totally out of their control that was responsible for their current situation.Continue reading